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Here's a Straw Made Just for Drinking Wine

Here's a Straw Made Just for Drinking Wine

A red wine lover creates straws for sipping wine without the stains

We know about red wine’s myriad advantages. But can we vent for a moment about the challenges?

Stained teeth are a serious drag. That slimy rim that develops around your inner lower lip is not attractive, either. And how many times is a woman supposed to reapply lip gloss before it’s considered obnoxious?

Jenny LaFever of Orange County, Calif., believes she has solved all three wine woes with Wine Straws. Taking a cue from dentists who have long endorsed the sipping of coffee, red wine, and other potentially teeth-staining beverages from straws, LaFever created these BPA-free plastic straws specifically for red wine lovers.

The inner diameter of a Wine Straw is smaller than your average soda-sipping straw. So the flow of red nectar into your gullet is the same as sipping from a glass. They are recyclable and come in packs of four ($2.99) or 12 ($6.99).

Now you can party with peace of mind — and mouth.

Click here for more from The Daily Sip.


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."


Change the Day: Here's The Real Problem With Single-Use Plastic Straws

We're skipping single-use plastic straws for a month, join us!

Introducing Change the Day

We&aposll offer simple ways you can have a positive impact on your health, your home, and even the world. Get inspired by our Change Makers and the companies that are making a difference in the way we live. Join us!

Let&aposs talk trash for a moment: think about the last time you ordered a smoothie from your favorite juicery or picked up your morning iced coffee. Now, think about what you did after you finished your drink chances are you threw everything - your cup, lid, and straw - in the trash. Or perhaps you thought, since it&aposs plastic, it could be be recycled. However, according to a recent global analysis on the effects of plastic pollution, a whopping 91% of all discarded plastic never actually gets recycled. For straws, it&aposs often due to their size. As a result, a majority of all plastic will end up in landfills or, more likely, the ocean.

"Plastic does not disappear. It does not go away," Nicholas Mallos, program director for Trash Free Seas at the Ocean Conservancy, a non-profit environmental advocacy and research organization, tells us. "And the same qualities that make it so useful in our everyday life - it&aposs cheap, it&aposs strong, it&aposs light - make them just as hard to break down."

BREAKING DOWN PLASTIC: WHAT (REALLY) HAPPENS AFTER YOU THROW IT OUT?

"There are so many different kinds of plastic, all made from different chemicals and called by different names," explains Dianna Cohen, co-founder and CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition. "Often times, people use plastic and, because they don&apost know if it can be recycled, won&apost recycle it. Plus, if some plastics - like food containers - are soiled, they can&apost be recycled." (That&aposs right, you have to rinse out your plastic containers before recycling them!)

For instance, some plastic items like beverage bottles are made out of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and can usually be recycled into new bottles. Meanwhile, plastic cling wrap, made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) often cannot be recycled with the rest of your curbside plastics. Fortunately, many states like California, New York, and Texas have many retailers that will take back these hard-to-recycle plastics as long as they are clean and dry (find out if your state has a retailer here!) For something like a plastic straw, which is made from polypropylene (PP) - also found in disposable diapers, baby bottles, and tubs like yogurt containers - its chemical composition comes in so many grades and types that it&aposs often difficult to properly sort and recycle. As a result, Cohen says a lot of plastic will end up in landfills. Because many landfills are built on or near oceans, trash will easily and often begin to overflow.

Factor in threats like illegal dumping and street litter washing away into drains, and each year you have more than 8 million tons of plastic ending up in the oceans. Mallos puts this number into perspective: "That&aposs a full New York City dump truck&aposs worth of plastic entering the ocean every minute of every day for a year."