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Hooked on Cheese: A Beginner’s Guide to Buying and Storing Cheese

Hooked on Cheese: A Beginner’s Guide to Buying and Storing Cheese


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Being nicknamed “The Cheese Guy,” I naturally get asked cheese questions on a daily basis. The most frequently asked question by far: “Where’s the best place to buy cheese?” It’s certainly a great question (with many subjective answers), but a better question would be: “How do you buy cheese the right way and keep it in peak condition?” In the name of enjoying the subtle flavors of every cheese when it’s at its best, here are my suggestions.

How to Buy

You may think buying good cheese is simple now that we have so many different specialty food choices at our fingertips, but think again. If you’re a discerning cheese-buyer, there are a few rules you must follow. For starters: always buy cheese from a cheese shop or specialty grocer. This may be a no-brainer, but it’s rare to find truly great cheese at a regular grocery store. Be sure to shop at a busy store, since they sell through their cheeses faster, thus their offerings will be fresher. Also, take a look around the cheese cutting area to make sure it’s super clean. And play to the shop’s strength – buy mozzarella at a store that features Italian cheeses, buy dry Jack from a shop that prides itself on its American selections.

Once you’ve found a retailer you like, develop a relationship with one of their knowledgeable (and, hopefully, passionate) cheesemongers. Sounds like overkill? Not at all! Good cheesemongers love to talk about cheese, so don’t be shy. As you become more comfortable with their recommendations and better able to define your own taste preferences, ask them for their suggestions. Be open minded and a bit adventurous.

Some great specific questions to ask: Which cheeses do you sell a lot of? What cheeses are new and exciting? Which wheels have you recently cut? Which cheeses are you currently eating?

If possible, try not to buy precut cheese, but politely ask the monger to cut you a piece to order. If they won’t, it’s a red flag – yes, it’s that important.

The final thing to keep in mind when buying cheese is that the cheeses a shop chooses not to sell are just as important as the cheeses they do. Selling only high-quality cheeses is an indicator of a retailer’s focus and standards; selling a mixture of great cheeses and sub-par cheeses shows a lack of commitment to excellence.

How to Store

Don’t worry – storing cheese is much easier than purchasing it proficiently!

  • Buy only enough cheese to last until the next time you can swing by your retailer of choice.
  • If you plan on eating your cheese the same day you bought it, it doesn’t need to be refrigerated.
  • If you have extra cheese you need to store for later consumption, wrap it in the cheese paper from the shop you bought it from. If they wrapped the cheese in plastic, unwrap it ASAP and wrap it in parchment paper or foil then place it in an oversized Tupperware-like container.
  • If mold grows on your cheese, just trim it off and the cheese will still be safe to eat.

Follow these suggestions and you’ll be able to enjoy your cheese at its finest. Just think: it may mean a bit of extra effort, but shouldn’t you eat cheese only when it’s at its prime?

You can follow Raymond's cheese adventures on Facebook, Twitter, and his website. Additional reporting by Madeleine James.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.


Juicing 101 A beginner's guide to getting started with juicing

No, these are two very different things. They're both very healthy for you, and one isn't better than the other, necessarily.

A smoothie is made in a blender. It's blended, not juiced. With a smoothie, you retain the pulp (which is insoluble fiber). This can be either gross or good depending on what you're blending. A blended drink yields a lot more because of the pulp, and some people like that, but others find it difficult to drink all of it.

Juice is juiced with a juicer. Juicers 'juice' your produce and separate the pulp (the insoluble fiber) from it. You discard the pulp and drink the juice. You still get fiber in the form of soluble fiber. I know, crazy, right? You just learned something new today.

Juicers are things like a Breville juice fountain, Omega VRT350, Omega 8006, etc. Not a nutribullet! A nutribullet is a blender that blends. Those blades chop things up like every blender works. It has pulp in it no matter how much you blend it. It can't turn into juice unless you separate the juice from the pulp or you apply magic to it (like their marketing team does).

If you only have a blender and still want to juice, you still can! If you get a cheese cloth or something similar, you can strain your blended drink and turn it into juice. It's a little more work and wont yield as much as a good juicer, but it's something.

If you want to read more about juicing vs blending, take a look at our article on Juicing vs Blending.

There's nothing wrong with smoothies. We love those too, and we even have a separate site dedicated to smoothie recipes because we consider the recipes to be so different. This isn't a battle of "what's better? Juice or smoothies?", it's a battle of "what do you like best?"

My friend said juicing isn't healthy because you don't get any fiber.

Fiber is what helps move food through the digestive system, but it's not digested. There's two types of fiber: 'soluble' and 'insoluble'.

When you juice, the pulp you see in the 'pulp bin' is mostly the insoluble fiber.

You're still getting plenty of soluble fiber in your juice. Even if your juice gave you 0 grams of fiber, it would still be very healthy for you.

It's like saying that your water isn't healthy because it doesn't have fiber in it. Juice is a healthy beverage and shouldn't be relied on for your insoluble fiber.

What's the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber?

Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.

Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.

We personally love the consistency and the great flavors we can make with juice. We can put weird things like sweet potatoes in our juicers and create a delicious dessert-like juice, but we sometimes feel a bit limited with flavors in our smoothies.

What's the easiest way to get started juicing?

Our Juice Challenges were created by us to make this whole juicing thing as simple as possible while still allowing you to challenge yourself to get into a healthier habit/lifestyle of juicing. Our free challenges aren't juice cleanses, they're a challenge to drink a minimum of 1 glass of juice a day, every day, for the length of the challenge. You still eat normally.

The reason why it's suggested for a beginner is because we supply you with a shopping list and we tell you which recipe to make every day using that shopping list, so we've taken a lot of the thought out of juicing so you can just focus on enjoying it.

After a challenge, you'll have a new sense of how flavors come together in your juice and you'll be able to start experimenting with your own recipes. People have lost weight and feel great after going through a challenge. Give it a try!

Other Fun Things

If you get a weird vegetable from the market, you can see if it exists in one of our recipes on our ingredients page or check out the nutrients in it by visiting our juice builder page.

Also, be sure to check out our collection of juice recipes at the top of this page. You might find it's exactly what you're looking to start with.