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America's 50 Best Fried Chicken Spots

America's 50 Best Fried Chicken Spots

We know, we know. You think your mom makes the best fried chicken period. Nostalgia and hometown bias aside, though, many of us are also very opinionated about our favorite fried chicken joints outside of our own childhood kitchens.

America's 50 Best Fried Chicken Spots (Slideshow)

Fried chicken is a quintessential American dish, along with hamburgers, hot dogs, apple pie, barbecue, peanut butter, and casseroles. It’s cheap, relatively easy to prepare (although some obviously do it better than others), and a great equalizer: no matter who you are or where you’re from, you’re expected to eat it with your hands.

Fried chicken may have a particularly strong association with the Southeast, but its roots belong to many immigrant populations who settled in all corners of the country. West African, European, and Asian cultures can all take some credit for both introducing and continuing the fried chicken tradition stateside. And just how important is this dish to Americans today? Well, it has its own national holiday: July 6.

Last year, we brought you an extensive roadmap of the country’s best places for fried chicken. This year, however, we decided to put together a list of the best spots for fried chicken across America (which you can certainly make into a road trip if you'd like!). So, how did we develop this year's list? We considered reader feedback while also consulting our staff and several national experts. Along with some necessary Midwest mentions (such as a couple of infamous dueling restaurants in Pittsburg, Kan.), we’ve included a unique venue that feeds its scraps to local raccoons, as well as a North Carolina church kitchen turned popular local restaurant.

Flour, water, salt, chicken, and lard are just the beginning when it comes to fried chicken. These basic ingredients lay the foundation for customization, whether it’s a vinegar-based marinade, cayenne, or even maple-honey butter. The possibilities are endless. Everyone’s got their favorite, so if your preferred establishment didn’t make this year’s cut, let us know by leaving a comment or tweeting @TheDailyMeal.

In ranking our list for the best fried chicken spots in America, we considered, of course, the taste and quality of the fried chicken (as reported by customer reviews, critics, and firsthand knowledge), any awards or accolades the venue has received, any awards or accolades the dish itself has received, the décor and atmosphere, and the price for the meal as well as the overall ratings by diners across the States.

We’ve listed the best of the best here, so be sure to consult our slideshow the next time you stray from your mom’s recipe.

50. Hill Country Fried Chicken: New York City

Marc Glosserman and Elizabeth Karmel had already done more than anyone could have imagined for New York City’s barbecue scene by launching Hill Country, so any other culinary accomplishments would be above and beyond. But that’s just what they’ve done with Hill Country Chicken: standardize New Yorkers’ understanding of what a well-done Southern staple should be. Hill Country Chicken celebrates the home-style cooking of Glosserman’s grandmothers, Elsia and Betty (Elsia was the buttermilk-brined chicken expert, and Betty knew pies). And when you bite into that crispy crust… well, don’t take our word for it; just try it.

49. Charles’ Country Pan Fried Country: New York City

Charles Gabriel of Charles’ Country Pan Fried Country in Harlem, New York, has been pan-frying chicken since he was a kid growing up just outside of Raleigh. Using nothing but a couple of pans and his mother’s recipe (which calls for the chicken to be turned and flipped over frequently), Gabriel has made his shop a New York institution; this no-frills joint serves some of the best fried chicken in the city.

Click here to see the complete list of America's 50 best fried chicken places.

Alexandra E. Petri is the travel editor at The Daily Meal. You can follow her on Twitter @writewayaround. Contributions to this article were also made by Arthur Bovino.


America's Best Fried Chicken Spots

We know, we know. You think your mom makes the best fried chicken period. Nostalgia and hometown bias aside, though, many of us are also very opinionated about our favorite fried chicken joints outside of our own childhood kitchens.

Fried chicken is a quintessential American dish, along with hamburgers, hot dogs, apple pie, barbecue, peanut butter, and casseroles. It's cheap, relatively easy to prepare (although some obviously do it better than others), and a great equalizer: no matter who you are or where you're from, you're expected to eat it with your hands.

Fried chicken may have a particularly strong association with the Southeast, but its roots belong to many immigrant populations who settled in all corners of the country. West African, European, and Asian cultures can all take some credit for both introducing and continuing the fried chicken tradition stateside. And just how important is this dish to Americans today? Well, it has its own national holiday: July 6.

Last year, we brought you an extensive roadmap of the country's best places for fried chicken. This year, however, we decided to put together a list of the best spots for fried chicken across America (which you can certainly make into a road trip if you'd like!). So, how did we develop this year's list? We considered reader feedback while also consulting our staff and several national experts. Along with some necessary Midwest mentions (such as a couple of infamous dueling restaurants in Pittsburg, Kan.), we've included a unique venue that feeds its scraps to local raccoons, as well as a North Carolina church kitchen turned popular local restaurant.

Flour, water, salt, chicken, and lard are just the beginning when it comes to fried chicken. These basic ingredients lay the foundation for customization, whether it's a vinegar-based marinade, cayenne, or even maple-honey butter. The possibilities are endless. Everyone's got their favorite, so if your preferred establishment didn't make this year's cut, let us know by leaving a comment or tweeting @TheDailyMeal.

In ranking our list for the best fried chicken spots in America, we considered, of course, the taste and quality of the fried chicken (as reported by customer reviews, critics, and firsthand knowledge), any awards or accolades the venue has received, any awards or accolades the dish itself has received, the décor and atmosphere, and the price for the meal as well as the overall ratings by diners across the States.

We've listed the best of the best here, so be sure to consult our slideshow the next time you stray from your mom's recipe.


1. Gus’s World Famous Fried Chicken: Mason and Memphis, Tenn.

The original Gus’s is in Mason, with a second location in the nearby city of Memphis. Both locations take their time when it comes to frying chicken, often taking twice as long to complete an order than the estimated time, but the wait is nothing once you take a bite of the heavenly chicken. The golden-brown crust on the outside locks in the juicy exterior, just as it should, and the seasoning of salt and cayenne shines through. So kick back at a gingham tablecloth-covered table, listen to the tunes playing from the jukebox, and await the arrival of a meal well worth it.


America’s 75 Best Fried Chicken Spots

Fried chicken is much loved in America, yes, but many cultures around the world fry chicken with great success. The best part about eating it in America is that these countless international styles of fried chicken, be they Korean or Serbian or anything else, are embraced, and restaurants that serve them have earned their spots in the canon — arguably the most delicious canon in existence.

Here are America’s 75 absolute best places to savor this universally loved meal, as picked by an expert panel that includes one of America’s foremost fried chicken experts, Lee Schrager, author of Fried & True: More than 50 Recipes for America’s Best Fried Chicken and founder of the South Beach Food and Wine Festival.

Let’s talk about what makes good fried chicken. As Schrager puts it, “I always look for something that’s perfectly crisp on the outside and juicy on the inside.” Dominique Love, founder of the Atlanta Food and Wine Festival, says: “Perfect fried chicken will burst with juicy flavors. If you don’t have to wipe juice from your chin, then your chicken missed the mark.” And how do we achieve that kind of flavor at home? “Personally, I’m a fan of the brining process (or, hint, get a kosher chicken if there’s no time to brine) and skillet frying,” says Schrager. “No overcrowding the skillet, though!” Love agrees that it is all about the brine.

So let’s enjoy a mental feast of the country’s best fried chicken. Think of this as the first step in planning your next culinary road trip across America.

#75 Jus Cookin’s Restaurant, Lakewood, Colo.

Fried chicken in Colorado? Don’t let the unlikely location of this family-owned eatery fool you into thinking it doesn’t have the drumsticks to wow your palate. Jus Cookin’s has been serving some of the nation’s best fried chicken from its unassuming “little yellow farmhouse” since 1988. The restaurant’s humble-yet-hearty meals have drawn the likes of Katie Couric and former Rockies pitcher Aaron Cook in for dinner.

#74 Tomken’s Bar & Grill, Milwaukee

Tomken’s Bar and Grill serves fried chicken “hobo-style,” with fries, coleslaw, and Italian bread. According to Thrillist, what makes it one of the nation’s best is the slim batter that doesn’t let the crunch overpower the poultry’s natural flavor. If you’re lucky, your visit might fall when the “sauce of the week” is the Nutty Rooster, which consists of peanut butter loosened with sriracha.

#73 New Golden Daisy, San Francisco

With an unassuming storefront in San Francisco’s Chinatown, New Golden Daisy serves platters full of their famous fried chicken drumettes, which absorb flavor from a simple dry marinade of salt and pepper with hints of ginger, garlic, and scallion. A pound of this good stuff will only set you back around $5.

#72 Maxine’s Chicken & Waffles, Indianapolis

The monochrome display of the chicken and waffles at Maxine’s looks boring but tastes delicious — the sweet potato waffle balances the three pieces of savory fried chicken incredibly well, and the house-made peach butter, which sits in the middle of the waffle like a scoop of ice cream, is quite the lip-smacking touch. If that’s not “a taste of love in every bite,” as the restaurant promises, we’re not sure what is.

#71 Trina’s Starlite Lounge, Boston

Trina’s, one of Boston’s quirkier eateries, features delicious, creative renditions of a dizzying variety of cuisines and cocktails in a vintage-noir, vaguely Southern atmosphere. Among other things, head chef Suzanne Maitland tops a buttermilk waffle with a piece or two of fried chicken and drizzles it with hot-pepper maple syrup. Paired with a signature Trina’s brunch cocktail (try the maple bourbon), This $14 meal is not one to miss — and it’s even better paired with a signature Trina’s brunch cocktail (we like the maple bourbon).

#70 Motor City Soul Food, Detroit

The inside of Motor City Soul Food looks more like a government bureau lobby than a take-out eatery, but this will stop bothering you the second you take a bite of their fried chicken — in fact, you’ll be grateful that the setup makes the wraparound line move so much faster. This spot is not shy of the Southern classics that restaurants up north are too afraid to put on the menu, such as oxtails and chitterlings Andrew Zimmern even paid it a visit when he was in Detroit. Oh, and the fried chicken, especially when paired with candied yams or mac and cheese? It’s divine.

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#69 Whole Truth Lunchroom, Wilson, N.C.
The Whole Truth Lunchroom began as a lunchroom for the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ of the Apostolic Faith, and eventually opened as a full-service restaurant. Their fried chicken, which is served on a paper plate or in a bag, is not to be underestimated, especially when followed by their banana pudding or sweet potato pie. Fresh and simple, this is where you should go if you want to taste true home-style fried chicken in the South.

#68 Two Sister’s Kitchen, Jackson, Miss.

Courtesy: Two Sister’s Kitchen

Two Sisters’ Kitchen opened in 1989 in a charming two-story Southern house and has been serving fried chicken and other Southern favorites, such as turnip greens, black-eyed peas, and fried okra, ever since. The favorite dishes at Two Sisters Kitchen are endless, from the macaroni and cheese to the bread pudding, but ultimately, the fan favorite is the Southern-style fried chicken. All of the favorites are available daily during a lunch buffet that will cost you $15. Make sure to leave room for dessert it’s included!

#67 Martha Lou’s, Charleston, S.C.

“If you want a fancy ambiance with a fancy price tag, you’ll have to go elsewhere,” warns Martha Lou’s website. But trust us: You don’t want to. The experience of eating this chicken, which is lightly dredged in flour and dipped in milk batter before being fried to perfection, is truly unique. What makes it even more worthwhile is that the eatery sits in a proudly feminine pink shack — the restaurant is run by Martha Lou, her daughters, and her granddaughters.

#66 Shirley Mae’s Café, Louisville, Kent.

The large pieces of Southern fried chicken wings at Shirley Mae’s Café prove that the restaurant doesn’t fool around when it comes to providing you with soul food that really fills you up. No item here is complete without a side of their hot water cornbread. According to a customer review, it is a true family-run business: Shirley Mae and her older daughter cook, her son waits, and Mae’s other daughter handles the music. Feels like home? You bet.

#65 Old Country Store, Lorman, Miss.

According to the Food Network, when Alton Brown wants fried chicken, he will eat only his own or the fried chicken at the Old Country Store. Located in a century-old general store, this comfort food buffet includes fried chicken that is well-seasoned and crispy, but doesn’t have that hard, manufactured shell of breading you’ll find in many chains. Arthur Davis, the owner, is known to break out of the kitchen and sing a song or two to diners while they feast.

#64 Magnum Restaurant & Lounge, Miami

Not many piano bars can also claim to have the best fried chicken in their city. But in Miami, Magnum Restaurant & Lounge is the exception they have made the Miami New Times’s “Best Fried Chicken” list multiple times in the past five years, thanks to none other than the owner’s mother and her foolproof recipe. Though management shifted recently, locals still seem to enjoy the ambiance and the food without much complaint.

#63 Magnolia 23, Asheboro, N.C.

Though only served on Wednesday nights and the occasional Sunday lunch, the fried chicken at Magnolia 23 has gained a loyal customer base and many fans. The eatery has a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence for being one of the best-reviewed restaurants in Asheboro. Make sure you include their mac and cheese in your order of meat and three sides you’re already savoring deliciously browned chicken, so there’s no point in salvaging a diet now.

#62 Alpine Inn, Omaha, Neb.

Alpine Inn might seem unassuming from its exterior, but their fried half-chickens served with large potato wedges should not be overlooked. In business for more than 40 years, the spot (which doubles as a biker bar at night) has been known to feed the roughly 50 local raccoons their leftover chicken scraps. But don’t be scared off by their furry friends we promise this dish is worth it.

#61 Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth, Frankenmuth, Mich.

The fried chicken at Zehnder’s of Frankenmuth was brought to our attention by readers who could not believe it wasn’t on our list last year. And for that, we apologize. Zehnder’s is a 1,500-seat institution that is famous for its all-you-can-eat German-style fried chicken dinners. Kitsch is the game here, as the restaurant is associated with a waterpark (and its adjoining hotel), but don’t let that fool you into thinking their fried chicken tries too hard. It is simple, salty, and keeps Midwesterners coming back for more.

#60 Max’s Wine Dive, Austin

“Fried chicken and Champagne?… Why the hell not?!” That is the question. It’s also the slogan of this Texas joint. The Austin location of Max’s Wine Dive features casual, industrial décor and top-notch food from chef Erica Beneke. Don’t miss their house-made jalapeño- and buttermilk-marinated chicken, deep-fried slow and low, served with mashed potatoes, collard greens, and Texas toast.

#59 Becky’s & Mary’s Restaurant, High Point, N.C.

There is something about fried chicken spots on the road less traveled that makes the food so appealing. It could be that you’re paying almost a quarter of what you’d be paying in New York or Miami for fried chicken that tastes just as good, or that the recipe is so specific to the family that runs the restaurant that it makes for an especially memorable experience. Becky’s and Mary’s Restaurant is like that. Don’t be fooled by the grooved Styrofoam containers and the menu scribbled on the whiteboard above: the fried chicken tastes absolutely glorious.

#58 Simpatica Dining Hall, Portland, Ore.

This place is known for butchering their meats on the premises, so you can imagine the chicken at Simpatica tastes fresh, even through the crunchy batter that hogs all the attention. Although the menu changes weekly, diners anxiously wait for the fried chicken to come up in the regular rotation. The signature dish is often paired with gravy and biscuits, and you can get it with waffles during brunch.

#57 Mrs. White’s Golden Rule Cafe, Phoenix

Most people probably don’t associate soul food with Phoenix, but Mrs. White’s Golden Rule Cafe might change that. Chef Beau MacMillan described this spot’s fried chicken on the Food Network’s The Best Thing I Ever Ate as, well, the best thing he ever ate. Could the “golden rule” have something to do with the technique that makes this fried chicken such a warm, inviting gold color? We can’t be sure, but here’s a golden suggestion: come early, because at lunch, this place is packed.

#56 Ma'ono Fried Chicken & Whisky, Seattle

Courtesy: Ma'ono Fried Chicken & Whisky

Twice fried and umami-spiced, the Hawaiian-style fried chicken at Seattle’s Ma’Ono is served with kimchee, rice, and chile sauce. You can order either a half or a whole bird, and a gluten-free option is available. If you have green sensibilities, you can rest assured that your chickens were raised naturally in Mount Vernon, Wash. Don’t forget to check out their extensive list of whiskeys to wash it all down.

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#55 Table Fifty-Two, Chicago

Lee Schrager counts the buttermilk-fried chicken at Chicago’s Table Fifty-Two one of his favorites. Chef Art Smith — who used to be Oprah Winfrey’s personal chef — has a few secret spices up his sleeve, but we do know that this bird is brined for three days before it is dredged. If you have room in your stomach, round off your meal with the hummingbird cake, a banana-pineapple spice cake with black currant coulis and walnut crunch.

#54 Hill Country Chicken, New York City

Marc Glosserman had already done more than anyone could have imagined for New York City’s barbecue scene by launching Hill Country and standardizing New Yorkers’ understanding of what this well-done Southern staple should be. Hill Country Chicken celebrates the home-style cooking of Glosserman’s grandmothers, Elsia and Betty (Elsia was the buttermilk-brined chicken expert, and Betty knew pies). It’s good news for you that they serve a seasonal fried chicken pot pie that combines the two.

#53 Yardbird Southern Table & Bar, Miami

Yardbird Southern Table & Bar brings a Southern charm and influence to Miami, a place better known for its Cuban and Spanish food. Former chef Jeff McInnis, who has since moved on from Yardbird to open Root & Bone in New York City, is said to have boiled this fried chicken recipe down to a science by brining the chicken for 27 hours before dredging it in cayenne-spiced flour and then frying it. Yardbird’s fried chicken has received numerous accolades in recent years, and for good reason. You just have to taste it yourself to see what the fuss is all about.

#52 Sweetie Pie’s, St. Louis

The brainchild of longtime performer Robbie Montgomery, who was once a backup singer for Ike and Tina Turner, Sweetie Pie’s has thousands of customers coming in each week who are devoted to the fried chicken, which calls for the cooks to fold and tuck the wing tips into the shoulder before deep-frying the bird. The grainy exterior and succulent interior are heavy in the stomach, but perfect for the soul.

#51 Hollyhock Hill, Indianapolis

Since it opened in 1928, Hollyhock Hill has grown from a 30-guest restaurant to one that holds 70 patrons to, finally, its current 150-seat location in Indianapolis. But while the seating count has changed multiple times, the “Hoosier pan-fried chicken” recipe has stayed the same. This four-ingredient chicken is cut through the breast crosswise instead of lengthwise, leaving the wishbone intact. “It’s the way fried chicken used to be cut,” cook Tom Sheron once told Saveur.

#50 Chicken Annie’s, Pittsburg, Kan.

Chicken Annie’s is known throughout Pittsburg, Kan., for their signature fried chicken. The restaurant had humble beginnings when founder Ann Pichler’s husband was injured in a coal mine accident in 1934, she began serving fried chicken out of their home to support the family. Word quickly spread of the delicious fare, and in 1972 the restaurant moved from her home to its present building. The homestyle hospitality, however, has never gone away. The family continues the tradition of excellent food with their “thin crust” fried chicken and house-battered onion rings.

#49 Rita’s Seaside Grille, Folly Beach, S.C.

Rita’s Seaside Grille is well known for creative twists on the classics, like their blackened tuna nachos with watermelon pico de gallo, and, of course, their fried chicken, served only for brunch, which comes sandwiched between two pancakes. This meeting of sweet and salty, soft and crunchy, is well worth the journey to their fantastic location, right on Folly Beach.

#48 Price’s Chicken Coop, Charlotte, N.C.

Price’s Chicken Coop, a Charlotte institution, is as renowned for their chicken liver and gizzards as they are for their fried chicken. Adam Richman from Man v. Food stopped by their kitchen to figure out their secret, and, while we won’t give it away, here’s a key aspect: there’s no dredge. The chicken is tossed in flour, and relies solely on the moisture from the poultry to make the flour stick. Apparently, it works like magic.

#47 Mrs. Wilkes Dining Room, Savannah, Ga.

The family-run Mrs. Wilkes Dining Room has been open since 1943. The menu at this Savannah institution changes every day, but you can rest assured you’ll get your fried chicken fix, so long as you don’t mind waiting in line. Expect crowds to start forming at around 9 a.m. You’ll be seated at communal tables of 10, so expect to talk at length with your new friends about how great your meal is.

#46 Mama Dip’s Country Cooking Restaurant, Chapel Hill, N.C.

In 1976, Mildred Council (also known as Mama Dip) opened this Chapel Hill restaurant with $64 to her name. When her food sold out in just a few hours, she knew she had something special, and Mama Dip’s Country Cooking Restaurant was born. Mama Dip learned to cook by watching family members in the kitchen expertly eyeballing measurements until the meals came out perfectly. Her fried chicken, one of the best-selling items on the menu, is an old family tradition. The recipe can be found in her Mama Dip’s Kitchen cookbook.

#45 Little Donkey, Birmingham, Ala.

Little Donkey, a Mexican restaurant, serves their fried chicken with a twist: it is brined overnight with a mixture of three chiles, and splashed with a house-made vinegar made from morita and habanero peppers to impart some added heat. It comes with two sides, and with options like elotes (corn-on-the-cob) and chipotle slaw, you’re set for a truly delicious meal. Southern Living calls Little Donkey one of the 100 best restaurants in the South.

#44 Jestine’s Kitchen, Charleston, S.C.

Jestine’s is one of those so-called “tourist traps” that is totally worth your time. The kitchen is named in honor of Jestine Matthews, who kept house and cooked for generations of owner Dana Berlin’s family. The menu here is pure Southern comfort, with fried green tomatoes, okra gumbo, and, of course, fried chicken, which is available in all-white and all-dark meat orders. Equally famous is their marshmallowy Coca-Cola chocolate cake, which Anthony Bourdain, Oprah, and Rachael Ray enthusiastically endorse.

#43 Café Dupont, Birmingham, Ala.

Photo: Facebook/Alexandra Smith

Café Dupont offers a “fresh perspective on regional ingredients” to create a menu bursting with traditional flavors and contemporary flair. This is most evident in their signature buttermilk-fried chicken with a lemon basil sauce, served atop warm creamed potatoes. You can thank the strong relationships chef Chris Dupont fosters with local farmers for the top-quality produce and meats that you’ll taste in every bite of their specialties.

#42 Beasley’s Chicken + Honey, Raleigh, N.C.

Don’t leave North Carolina having only eaten barbecue the pressure-fried bird at Beasley’s Chicken & Honey is an absolute must. The combination of steaming and frying chicken kisses goodbye to all dryness, and a drizzle of honey — which chef Ashley Christensen includes as a tribute to her beekeeping father — gives this spot a personal and literally sweet touch.

#41 Babe’s Chicken Dinner House, Multiple Locations in Texas

Babe’s Chicken Dinner House is a fried-chicken empire in the good old state of Texas that has its origins in Dallas, where it is called Bubba’s. Expect plates with perfectly breaded fried chicken piled sky high — as they say, go big or go home. And the best part? The quality of the chicken absolutely matches the generous portions.

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#40 Belgrade Gardens, Barberton, Ohio

Barberton is known as the “Chicken Capital of the World” because it serves seven and a half tons of chicken a week between just four restaurants, the oldest of which is Belgrade Gardens. The restaurant, which opened during the Great Depression, serves fried chicken in the Serbian-American (or “Barberton”) style, which is said to resemble Serbian fried chicken (pohovana piletina) very closely. This recipe relies on fresh (never frozen) bird, lard, and no seasoning. The fact that this creation tastes so good without seasoning is truly something worth going to Ohio (or Belgrade) for.

#39 Watershed on Peachtree, Atlanta

Courtesy: Watershed on Peachtree

Though Watershed on Peachtree changed locations in 2012, moving from Decatur to Buckhead, it still serves some of the best fried chicken in Atlanta. Named one of the best new restaurants of 2013 by Condé Nast Traveler, Watershed on Peachtree is famous for their brined and buttermilk-soaked chicken that is fried in lard and ham fat before being presented to you. But be warned: Watershed only sells fried chicken for lunch and dinner on its so-called fried chicken Wednesdays, so be sure to get in early. You’ll be lucky if there is any fried chicken left past 7 p.m.

The Local serves their fried chicken a few different ways: in a bucket, in a sandwich, and just the leg as an entrée. Each preparation is phenomenal. The leg comes with cornbread, bacon dressing, split peas, and country ham reduction, and the sandwich is served with a buttermilk emulsion. It may sound unusual, but these fancy sauces pair wonderfully with this simple, beloved dish. Wash it down with something from their excellent craft beer list.

#37 Dooky Chase’s Restaurant, New Orleans

Dooky Chase’s Restaurant began in 1939 as a sandwich shop and lottery ticket outlet, and grew to become a spot where Civil Rights leaders met to discuss politics and culture. Owner and chef Leah Chase is a legend who is often referred to as the “Queen of Creole Cuisine” there’s even a portrait of her in the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery. The secret to this extra-crunchy fried chicken is the evaporated milk that’s used in the egg wash.

#36 The Dutch, New York City and Miami

The fried chicken at The Dutch, which is available for lunch and brunch but not supper, definitely lives up to the hype. Fried chicken expert Lee Schrager insisted that we add it to this list after he took a look at last year’s ranking. The buttermilk their chicken is soaked in includes a winning mix of cayenne, Old Bay, honey, and Tabasco. This popular SoHo spot also has a location in Miami.

#35 Lo-Lo’s Chicken & Waffles, Multiple Locations in Ariz.

The Phoenix New Times voted the fried chicken at Lo-Lo’s Chicken and Waffles one of the best in the Phoenix metro area for its uncomplicated take on this classic. There’s even more praise for it in other publications: Thrillist calls this place one of the best soul food restaurants in the country. And you should drink the Kool-Aid, literally — they serve it in Mason jars.

#34 The People’s Pig, Portland, Ore.

Bird at a pig joint? It’d better be good. The People’s Pig, which was once a food truck — one of the 101 best in America, in fact — smokes their chicken before frying it. Served on a roll with a wig of coleslaw, this sandwich is barbecue and soul food heaven. And if you go back for another meal, which you should, get their equally famous porchetta.

#33 Hard Water, San Francisco

Fried chicken expert Lee Schrager informed The Daily Meal that Hard Water in San Francisco needs to be on this list. While it is better known for being a New Orleans-style whiskey bar, their fried chicken, which comes two ways — “Hard Water-Style” with a buttermilk biscuit and pepper gravy or “Spicy Nashville-style” with Parker house rolls and butter pickles — gets its unique taste from being dry-brined in salt and garlic powder, left alone for a day, then dredged in a spice mix with turmeric and coriander before landing in the deep-fryer.

#32 Maharlika, New York City

New York’s Maharlika serves a “batterless” Filipino-style fried chicken That’s right. No batter or breading just marinated and deep-fried. And it’s delicious. Served on top of a purple yam waffle with anchovy-bangoong (fish paste) compound butter and caramelized macapuno syrup, this fried chicken earned its place on our radar thanks to fried chicken expert Lee Schrager’s recommendation. Don’t miss other fantastic menu items like arroz caldo (spiced chicken and rice porridge), Spam fries, and, if you’re feeling adventurous, try the balut (boiled duck embryo), which is allegedly an aphrodisiac.

#31 Coop’s Place, New Orleans

Located in the French Quarter, Coop’s Place serves Cajun fried chicken seasoned with a house-special bayou blend alongside rabbit and sausage jambalaya — a distinctly New Orleans twist one can only expect from such an institution. Bear in mind that those under 21 years of age are not allowed inside, due to the presence of video poker machines.

“Fried chicken with spicy soy sauce” is how this famous fried chicken is described on the menu. The same modesty can be found in the no-frills atmosphere at Miami’s Hy Vong, which comes with a heartwarming origin story. In 1975, former math teacher Kathy Manning and Tung Nguyen, a widowed and pregnant refugee from Vietnam, opened this restaurant in Calle Ocho in order to pay for Nguyen’s daughter’s education. Nguyen has since attended Harvard and Cornell, and Hy Vong (which means “hope” in Vietnamese) serves Vietnamese-style fried chicken that Lee Schrager and many other fried chicken aficionados flock to the perpetually packed dining room to enjoy.

Located in The Ritz-Carlton Dallas, Fearing’s features modern Southwestern-American cuisine with a farm-to-table approach (think chicken-fried Maine lobster or barbecued shrimp taco with mango and pickled red onion salad). But the real treat comes during the weekend brunch, which features Granny Fearing’s “Paper Bag Shook” fried chicken, served with whipped potatoes, green beans, and tomato gravy. The ebullient chef Dean Fearing is often present.

#28 Blue Ribbon Sushi Bar & Grill, Las Vegas

The Blue Ribbon restaurant group, headed by brothers Bruce and Eric Bromberg, includes a handful of restaurants across the country some are bakeries, some are fried chicken-only spots, some are sushi restaurants. But the winner in the fried chicken realm is Blue Ribbon Sushi Bar & Grill at The Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas. The chicken here is just as good as the examples in their fried chicken-only spots in New York and Las Vegas, except at the restaurant, it is served tempura-style, with a winning combination of wasabi and honey. Try the fried chicken at any of their locations, but for a uniquely Japanese twist, head to Sin City.

#27 The Chicken Shack, Evanston, Ill.

Voted the best fried chicken in Chicago by Thrillist for its balanced and generous salt and pepper breading, the bird at the Chicken Shack in Evanston attracts way more people than just hungry Northwestern University kids. With sides like phenomenal biscuits and house barbecue sauce, this casual eatery is certainly worth its salt.

#26 Charles’ Country Pan Fried Chicken, New York City

Charles Gabriel of Charles’ Country Pan Fried Chicken, whom the New Yorker dubs “the fried-chicken king of Harlem,” has been pan-frying chicken since he was a kid growing up just outside of Raleigh. Using nothing but a couple of pans and his mother’s recipe (which calls for the chicken to be turned and flipped over frequently), Gabriel has made his shop a New York institution.

#25 Holeman & Finch, Atlanta

Courtesy: Holeman & Finch

We know the burger at Holeman & Finch Public House is one of America’s best, so it should come as no surprise that they do fried chicken very well too. They serve their “hot chicken,” a tribute to the cayenne pepper-heavy style mastered by Prince’s Hot Chicken in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday nights only. Nestled under pickles and atop a thick slice of white bread, this beloved restaurant’s take on the popular dish is not to be missed.

#24 Loveless Cafe, Nashville

Loveless Cafe, named after founders Lon and Annie Loveless, has an ironic name. Not only is their fried chicken one of the city’s most beloved dishes, but a lot of love goes into their food — and has for over 60 years. The fried chicken recipe, which has remained unchanged since 1951, uses self-rising flour and a special house blend of spices. Other famous items from the Loveless Cafe menu include Kentucky Bourbon Peach Shortcake and the Bee Sting Moonshine Cocktail.

#23 Red Rooster, New York City

New York magazine calls the fried yard bird chicken at Marcus Samuelsson’s Red Rooster the most satisfying of all the dishes at the popular Harlem restaurant, thanks to its “candy-like” crust and well-chosen accompaniments of spicy collard greens and mace gravy. Samuelsson channels his Ethiopian roots to make this chicken stand out, using a berbere spice blend on his chicken before frying it twice. He also adds coconut milk to the buttermilk, and uses bunches of rosemary in the frying oil. All of this results in some of America’s best fried chicken.

#22 Ms. P’s Electric Cock, Austin

Yup, you read that name right. The best part about Ms. P’s Electric Cock is that their fried chicken will make your mouth water as you giggle, all as a result of the twice-brined, 12-spiced, fresh-herb topped perfection. The chicken here is always fresh, never frozen. The kitchen is housed in a once-dilapidated 1950s Spartan Imperial Mansion trailer that Ms. P’s husband found in a field outside of Austin, and it’s surrounded by picnic tables where people can sit and enjoy their fried chicken with sides like truffle mac and cheese and Mexican-style grilled corn. Make sure to say hi to the ebullient Ms. P, who is almost always in the kitchen, on your way out.

#21 Arnold’s Country Chicken, Nashville

Arnold’s Country Chicken has been serving homestyle “meat and three” platters (a meat entrée with three sides) and delectable fried chicken to Nashville for about 30 years. The secret to their famous fried chicken recipe is a kosher salt and ground black pepper brine, a Louisiana-style hot sauce wash, and a cayenne and garlic powder dredge. The result of those fancy culinary verbs is nearly perfect fried chicken that has folks lining up well past the door. Don’t forget to try the grilled cornbread and famously creamy banana pudding.

#20 Honey’s Kettle, Culver City, Calif.

You might not be vegetarian, but the chicken that you’ll eat at Honey’s Kettle certainly was. Humanely raised, hormone- and antibiotic-free chicken and a crispy, golden batter that could make for a delicious dish on its own are key at this airy, no-frills eatery in West L.A. Thrillist calls it the best fried chicken in Los Angeles, and, according to them, “It wasn’t even a close race.”

#19 Biscuit Love, Nashville

Husband-and-wife team Karl and Sarah Worley began Biscuit Love as a truck in 2012, but have since opened a brick-and-mortar brunch spot with more options. Their hot fried chicken is as good as ever, though, as is their “Easy Nasty”: fried chicken thighs with aged cheddar and sausage gravy. In 2014, Karl Worley told The Daily Meal that house-made mustard and local honey play off the spices in the hot chicken that might be why, in the few years that it’s been up and running, Biscuit Love has already become a Nashville institution.

#17 Federal Donuts, Philadelphia

Philadelphia has long been food-famous, but just for cheesesteaks and pretzels, right? Not so for the past few years, since Federal Donuts opened. While they are celebrated for their doughnuts, which come in unusual flavors like lavender, their tasty Korean-style fried chicken is also a force to be reckoned with. Every order of chicken includes Japanese cucumber pickles and a honey doughnut, and is served with your choice of dry seasoning (coconut curry or za’atar buttermilk ranch) and glaze (chili-garlic or honey ginger).

#16 Mary Mac’s Tea Room, Atlanta

Mary Mac’s Tea Room is an Atlanta institution that has been serving flocks of happy diners since 1945. The fried chicken is one of the best dishes there, and it’s easy to see why. Mary Mac’s Tea Room makes a double-battered fried chicken that comes as a four-piece set with the legs, breast, thigh, and wing, or as a fried chicken plate of three wings or one chicken breast. Did we mention that upon your visit to Mary Mac’s you’re entitled to a complimentary cup of pot likker (the juice left in a pot after collards cook, which is believed to be an aphrodisiac) and a piece of cornbread?

#15 Husk, Charleston, S.C.

The original Charleston and the Nashville locations of Husk are located in stunning Victorian-style houses, and the fried chicken at both branches is equally picturesque. Once upon a time, diners had to call ahead and place an order with the chef himself, James Beard award-winning Sean Brock, two days in advance, but now the fried chicken is a staple on the daily-changing lunch menus of both locations. The secret is fat: The chicken is fried in butter, chicken fat, bacon fat, and country ham fat.

#14 Blackberry Farm, Walland, Tenn.

Sweet tea and fried chicken? Welcome to Tennessee. At Blackberry Farm, not only can you drink sweet tea alongside fried chicken, but there is sweet tea in the brine used for the masa harina-coated fried chicken. This spot is highly praised by Lee Schrager and many other fried chicken aficionados.

#13 Stroud’s, Kansas City, Mo.

In business since 1933, Stroud’s is known for their famous pan-fried-to-order chicken served out of “an expanded 1829 log cabin and farm house.” In fact, as an indication that the restaurant still does things the old way, one of their mottos (available on popular T-shirts) is “We choke our own chickens.” The establishment has won multiple awards and been featured in The New York Times, Bon Appétit, and Gourmet over the years. Along with the chicken, customers rave about the mashed potatoes and cinnamon rolls, which are decadent additions to your meal, but certainly worth the extra calories.

#12 Root & Bone, New York City

The sweet tea-brined, pickled lemon-dusted crispy fried chicken with spiked Tabasco honey at Root & Bone may sound super “New York,” but it’s really just a really well-executed, slightly fancy version of this classic dish. This is the kind of thing people talk about and create a destination around, and with good reason.

#11 Harold’s Chicken Shack, Chicago

Known as President Obama’s favorite fried chicken place, Harold’s has become a small local chain, and it continues to grow in popularity. But despite having numerous locations across the city, Harold’s never sacrifices the quality it’s known for. The chicken comes simply with white bread and hot sauce, and there are no frills about it — but with a product that tastes this outstanding on its own, there are no embellishments needed.

#10 Ad Hoc/Addendum, Yountville, Calif.

You can always count on Thomas Keller for excellent food, and the fried chicken at Ad Hoc is no exception. Every weeknight has a special menu, and while spectacular food is always a given, customers disproportionately requested reservations for fried chicken night. So Keller did everybody a favor and opened Addendum, which serves boxed lunches to go Thursdays through Saturdays. The most popular option? You guessed it. That fried chicken.

#9 Roscoe’s House of Chicken and Waffles, Multiple Locations in California

This late-night spot, originally located in Hollywood, has been serving up fried chicken and waffles since 1975 — when owner and Harlem-bred Herb Hudson brought some recipes from home to the West Coast — and has since expanded into a small local chain of restaurants. The list of celebrity diners is endless (which is no surprise, considering its Los Angeles locale), but regulars include Snoop Dogg and Larry King even President Obama made a pit stop at Roscoe’s during a visit to Los Angeles. The chicken is fried fresh to order, and make sure to ask for your waffles to be cooked extra-crispy to avoid potential sogginess. Roscoe’s has been mentioned in movies like Rush Hour and Swingers, as well as in a Ludacris song, and their fried chicken has earned praised from LA Weekly and The New York Times.

#8 Momofuku Noodle Bar, New York City

Momofuku Noodle Bar doesn’t just serve fried chicken Momofuku Noodle Bar serves a feast. This specialty even has its own section on the menu. Expect to get two whole fried chickens, one Southern-style chicken that is fried with Old Bay-seasoned buttermilk, and one Korean-style chicken that’s triple-fried and served with a light spicy glaze. As if that’s not enough, the meal comes with mu shu pancakes, baby carrots, red ball radishes, bibb lettuce, four sauces, and an herb basket. Whether your party is of four or 10, nobody will be disappointed with this delicious feast. Lovers of Momofuku fried chicken now have more reason to rejoice: Chang recently opened Fuku, a lunch spot in New York, which only serves fried chicken bao bun sandwiches, fries, and salad.

#7 Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack, Nashville

Prince’s Hot Chicken is widely recognized as one of the best dives for fried chicken. The chicken is available with four different levels of spice: mild, medium, hot, and extra hot. Unlike most chicken wings that are dripping in sauce, Prince’s chicken is generously seasoned and fried to perfection. So famous and legendary is Prince’s Hot Chicken shack that the fried chicken at Holeman & Finch Public House (No. 25 on this list) is a tribute to Prince’s. In fact, they invented “Nashville hot chicken.” If that’s not reason enough to visit, then we’re not sure what is.

#6 Hattie B’s, Nashville

The chicken at Hattie B’s is not for those who are afraid of heat, though there is a no-spice option available for people who just want to enjoy the perfectly crisp, not-too-thick texture. The secret to the perfect spice is actually a little bit of brown sugar to lighten up the cayenne. Expect to wait in line for at least an hour, but also expect to not regret doing so once you get this incredible plate of chicken.

#5 Pies ‘n’ Thighs, Brooklyn

The fried chicken at this beloved Williamsburg gem is seasoned liberally with black pepper, cayenne, and paprika, making for a potent and flavorful golden brown crust. The atmosphere is laid-back, yet charming, with small tables and enough seating for only a few lucky guests at a time. The flaky homemade biscuits are almost croissant-like, and the rotating selection of pies (try the lemon chess pie) make for outstanding accompaniments to the juicy chicken.

#4 Son of a Gun, Los Angeles

If you find yourself in Los Angeles, stopping for some fried chicken at Son of a Gun should be at the top of your list (and not just because it’s at the top of ours). This isn’t your typical plate of fried chicken here, you’ll find a hearty fried chicken sandwich on the menu. The chicken is generously topped with spicy B&B pickle slaw and sits atop a smear of sriracha aïoli. This messy $11 sandwich will be well worth every penny, every bite, every stain on your finger and probably your clothing, too.

#3 Lucy’s Fried Chicken, Austin

A dark horse candidate, Lucy’s Fried Chicken was not on our previous list, but soared to the top of this year’s. Why? It might be because they know when to stick with the classics and when to experiment. Their menu offers fried gizzards and fried livers alongside the expected fried chicken basket, with no fancy explanation as to why the chicken tastes so good. They even serve a cold fried chicken that’s also delicious, and that’s saying something. It’s in their other menu items that they get creative: see the grilled diablo oysters, Mexican Coke sweet potatoes, and sweet tea cheese pie.

#2 Gus’s World Famous Fried Chicken, Mason, Tenn.

The original Gus’s is in Mason, but it has six locations in four states — all south of the Mason-Dixon Line. But don’t worry they are planning on expanding far beyond that. The wait is notoriously long — not only because there are plenty of people in line, but also because Gus’s has been reported to take twice as long to complete an order than their estimated time. Still worth it? Most definitely. The golden brown casing keeps the interior juicy, and the simple but effective team of salt and cayenne make for a seasoning that lingers on your lips (and is most welcome there).

#1 Willie Mae’s Scotch House, New Orleans

Willie Mae Seaton began serving mind-blowing fried chicken from a shack attached to her Tremé home more than 30 years ago. The low-key operation remained a local treasure until 2005, when the James Beard Foundation honored it with its “American Classic” award and let the rest of the nation in on the secret. A few weeks after winning the award, Willie Mae’s Scotch House was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, but members of the Southern Foodways Alliance pulled together to rebuild the cherished chicken establishment. We — and many other diners the world over — are so happy and grateful that they did. Mae’s great-granddaughter runs the Scotch House now, and a few Seaton family members populate the small staff, upholding the same dedication to unadulterated Southern cuisine that the restaurant is so well known for.

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The 21 Best Fried Chicken Spots in America

Fried chicken just might be the world's most versatile food. It makes just as much sense at the dinner table or in your car or at breakfast with waffles, as it does at 3 a.m. out of the fridge or during the seventh-inning stretch of an intramural, co-ed softball game. Though there are many styles, we opted to stick to Southern fried chicken because it's the truest, oldest, American-est form. Our research took us from famed chicken shacks in Nashville to an 1800s log cabin in Kansas City and down to Miami. Yes, even Miami. Disagreements? Omissions? Compliments for our impeccable taste? Leave 'em in the comments. But for now, tuck your napkin into your shirt, break out the biscuits and sweet tea, and savor our picks for the best fried chicken across the US of A.


Courtesy of the Barbecue Inn

Houston, TX
Since 1946, the place that sounds like my favorite fever dream hotel ever has been serving up outstanding barbecue and fried foods to the citizens of Houston. My mom claims that -- when I was born -- they used to drive 45 minutes from our house over on Westleigh just to get the Chicken Fried Steak and that incredible, crispy Southern Fried Chicken, while I sat there sleeping and NOT EVEN ENJOYING THE INCREDIBLE FOODS PRESENTED TO ME. The best move is to order the alarmingly juicy All Dark. You've got to wait a half hour to get it, but when you do (alongside a stuffed baked potato with chopped beef) you'll understand why I'm still mad at my mom for refusing to give me some.


Courtesy of Brenda's Meat & Three

San Francisco, CA
For years, Brenda's French Soul Food had people standing in line for brunch way before it was trendy. And now that she's opened a more casual diner on Divis, people are going to have to get used to standing in line for dinner. Though you have no choice but to get Brenda's Fried Chicken -- just a little spicy and peppery and crispy, and it's perfect with the collards and that cauliflower gratin -- we're also pretty damn partial to the spicy chicken sandwich, which utilizes that same secret recipe crispy chicken, but throws in enough heat to balance against the coolness coming from the mayo, pickles, and lettuce.

Atlanta, GA
Don't let the cute name fool you: this isn't a ladies-who-lunch spot, unless those ladies like grease spots on their cardigans. Busy Bee has been the best fried chicken spot in Atlanta since it opened in 1947, and, in a city that boasts soul food spots like lesser cities boast McDonald's, that means a lot. The chicken brines for 12 hours before it's tossed in lightly seasoned flour and plunged into a hot peanut oil bath. The only thing better than the chicken is the chicken smothered in pan gravy with two sides: get collards and broccoli and cheese casserole.


Credit: Mike Gebert/Thrillist

Evanston, IL
Just North of the Chicago city limits, this chicken shack (they are aptly named!) has been winning Chicagoland over for a quarter-century with its juicy bird thoroughly covered in a batter that achieves just the right levels of crispness and seasoning. While it doesn't need any help, dipping it in some of their delightfully spiced BBQ isn't a half-bad move. Foregoing the biscuits, however, is an extremely bad move.

Memphis, TN
If I'd written this a week ago, I could have told you that Gus's chicken is famous enough to have 10 locations, 5 in its Tennessee home state and a few more dotted through the South. But I'm writing this RIGHT NOW, two days after the Memphis-based restaurant announced its paprika and cayenne-spiked fried chicken will be arriving in spots as far as Los Angeles and Chicago this year. So, Midwest & West Coast friends, do yourself a favor and get yourself to one of these gingham-draped tables, ease yourself into Deep South flavor with fried pickles spears, order a beer, and get to know Gus's spicy chicken.


Courtesy of Hollyhock Hill

Indianapolis, IN
Do you know what a hollyhock is? I didn't. It's a tall Eurasian plant of the mallow family and has "large showy flowers." Well, apparently they grow in Indiana in the place where V.D. Vincent and his wife started serving special dinners at their cottage. It's only had two other owners since that time, run now by the Snyders, who've been a part of the restaurant for over fifty years. But enough history, let's get to the good stuff. The fried chicken is the first thing you'll see on those menus, as they've already figured out the appetizers, salad, and side dishes for you. They call it "famous, Hoosier, pan-fried chicken." You'll just call it "that thing I need to eat at least fifty more times in my life."


Courtesy of Bob Hodson Photography

Culver City, CA
Vincent Williams, the master chef at Honey's Kettle, has "over 40 years of fried chicken cooking experience." He is purported to have fried "millions of pieces of chicken every year." And according to Malcolm Gladwell theories, that puts him so far over the 10,000 hour mark, he likely has no choice but to be the best fried chicken chef in the damn world. And judging by his chicken, that theory might hold up. All of it is hand-dipped in a special batter that is impervious to high temperatures and cooked up in peanut oil. Do yourself a favor and get the three-piece with a wing, leg, and thigh in the mix, plus those buttermilk biscuits. Then dip everything in honey and figure out what you should dedicate 10,000 hours to. It might just be eating this chicken.


Courtesy of Michael Persico

Philadelphia, PA
Though the hype surrounding Federal Doughnuts can -- at times -- reach some sort of a deafening fever pitch, what with the lines and the handing out of cards entitling you to fried chicken, chef Michael Solomonov's bastion of fried birds and dough continues to be worth temporarily losing your hearing over. Though the chili-garlic glaze is delicious, you're going to want to get the buttermilk ranch or za'atar dry rub on a half order (the "naked" version is very good, but the spices move it into Nic Cage 'High Praise' territory. Oh, AND: it comes with Japanese cucumber pickles and a honey donut, because that's really the only thing that can show waffles what's up.

Chapel Hill, NC
The first time I went to Chapel Hill, it was for a wedding. But REALLY, it was to backseat-drive a car-ful of my extended family to Mama Dip's, tucked off the college town's main drag, for a two-hour lunch. Mildred Council, aka Mama Dip, so nicknamed because her "long arms allowed her to 'dip'" to the bottom of the rain barrel as a kid, started serving her lightly peppered shortening-fried chicken back in 1976. The move is half a fried chicken with greens (it changes daily, but you can trust it all, collards, turnips, or mustards), and black eyed peas -- both are cooked with pork, of course. And your next move is to avoid falling asleep in the wood-paneled restaurant with its Grandma-approved patterned curtains and front porch. It may look like a living room, but, just because you ate half a bird, you can't sleep there.


Credit: Megan Frye/Thrillist

Detroit, MI
Detroit takes its soul very, very seriously, whether it's coming from the voices of Motown legends or the kitchens of its restaurants. Motor City Soul Food is basically Detroit on a plate, a pile of perfectly cooked soul favorites served up by hard-working folks who take immense pride in their work, even if they're forced to do that work from behind bulletproof glass. The chicken itself is a thing of such simple, crispy perfection that more than warrants the line that frequently wraps out the door. The sides do it equal justice, but don't fill up too much on candied yams and okra, or you'll miss out on one of the best damned banana puddings in the world.


Fried & True : More Than 50 Recipes for America's Best Fried Chicken and Sides (Paperback)

Lee Schrager has left no stone unturned in his quest to find America's best fried chicken. From four-star restaurants to roadside fry shacks, you'll learn how to brine your bird, give it a buttermilk bath, batter or even double batter it, season with loads of spices, and fry it up to golden perfection. Recipes to savor include:

-Hattie B's Hot Chicken
-Yotam Ottolenghi's Seeded Chicken Schnitzel with Parsley-Caper Mayonnaise
-Marcus Samuelsson's Coconut Fried Chicken with Collards and Gravy
-Jacques-Imo's Fried Chicken and Smothered Cabbage
-The Loveless Café's Fried Chicken and Hash Brown Casserole
-Blackberry Farm's Sweet Tea-Brined Fried Chicken
-Charles Phan's Hard Water Fried Chicken
-Thomas Keller's Buttermilk Fried Chicken
-Wylie Dufresne's Popeyes-Style Chicken Tenders and Biscuits

Sink your teeth into Fried & True, the source of your next great fried chicken masterpiece and a tribute to America's most beloved culinary treasure.• Author: Lee Brian Schrager,Adeena Sussman • ISBN:9780770435226 • Format:Paperback • Publication Date:2014-05-20


The 10 Best Fried Chicken Joints in America, Ranked

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If KFC is the closest you’ve gotten to tasting fried chicken, consider yourself challenged to try these 10 excellent fried chicken joints. There’s always baked, grilled, broiled and boiled. But everyone’s favorite type of chicken is fried, because I mean, it’s fried. I’m sure you have your local favorite joint to get your chicken fix, but put these on your bucket list the next time you want top-shelf yardbird.

10. Free Range LA (Los Angeles area)

Photo courtesy of @freerangela on Instagram

This social media powerhouse serves up some of the best fried chicken on the West Coast via their trendy food truck. Passionate about farmers markets and giving customers quality cuisine, the original Free Range chicken sandwich is not one to miss when out in California.

9. Raising Cane’s (Baton Rouge, Louisiana)

Photo courtesy of @raisingcanes on Instagram

Our friends at Spoon LSU voted this fast-food joint their favorite place to grab fried chicken in Baton Rouge. Noted as a BR staple because of the crispy quality and cheap prices, Raising Cane’s is raising some die-hard fans. Go for the 3-Finger Combo and don’t hesitate to dive in for seconds when it comes to the sauce.

8. Honey’s Kettle (Culver City, California)

Photo courtesy of @honeyskettle on Instagram

Cooked in peanut oil using “nutritionally superior” chicken as noted by the owners, Honey’s Kettle in downtown LA has a taste you’ll remember. It’s comfort food without the guilt and grease.

7. Horseradish Grill (Atlanta, Georgia)

Photo courtesy of yelp.com

If you’re in the mood for something a little more lavish, try this Atlanta restaurant. It’s an inviting atmosphere, but with backyard-good, succulent yardbird. You can’t go wrong with their chicken dish and sides of slaw and mashed potatoes.

6. Gladys Knight’s Signature Chicken & Waffles

(Atlanta, Georgia)

Photo courtesy of @hsquared27 on Instagram

Get here early on the weekends to avoid the wait because your mouth will already be watering at the thought of entering Atlanta’s famous Gladys Knight’s for their signature chicken & waffles.

5. Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken (Las Vegas, NV & New York, NY)

Photo courtesy of @blueribbonfc on Instagram

A foodstagram fanatic? Check out Blue Ribbon’s page for a feed solely dedicated to their chicken art. Seriously, a meal that good deserves to be in a museum. You might not even be patient enough to take the photo with those tenders and drumsticks in front of you. Insta might miss it, but your tastebuds won’t mind.

4. Top Notch (Austin, Texas)

Photo courtesy of @smallbatchcraft on Instagram

When it comes to cars, movies, and well, chicken, nothing beats the classics. Top Notch has been serving up Austin’s crispiest, juiciest chicken since 1971 and there’s no stopping em’. Go here if only for the A Cinderella Story vibes you get from that sign.

3. Hattie B’s (Nashville, TN)

Photo courtesy of @hattiebs on Instagram

Shut the cluck up (their words, not mine) because imma need to talk about Hattie B’s for a hot second. This family-run Nashville joint has people road tripping down South just for their hot fried chicken, pickles, and iced tea combo. Leave room for dessert, because you’re going to want to try their banana pudding.

2. Ezell’s (Seattle, Washington)

Photo courtesy of @ezells_chicken on Instagram

Obviously, Oprah’s favorite makes it to our top three. Probably because as their slogan states: they’re “fresh, good, and fast.” Honestly, with Oprah’s schedule, what more could you want? I’ll have what she’s having.

1. Willie Mae’s Scotch House (New Orleans, Louisiana)

Photo courtesy of @williemaesnola on Instagram

As soon as you hit the homepage, you’ll see the declarative statement “America’s Best Fried Chicken” right there for yo’ eyeballs. And for good reason: Willie Mae’s is simply a legendary spot in NOLA and beyond. Not only do they have a history worth reading about, but the restaurant keeps that history alive by giving customers and outsiders a reason to come back for more.


Fried & True: More than 50 Recipes for America’s Best Fried Chicken and Sides

Whether you prefer it cold out of the fridge or hot and crispy on a buttery biscuit, you will find your new favorite fried chicken recipe in Fried & True, serving up more than 50 recipes for America&rsquos most decadently delicious food. Lee Schrager has left no stone unturned in his quest to find America&rsquos best fried chicken. From four-star restaurants to roadside fry shacks, you&rsquoll learn how to brine your bird, give it a buttermilk bath, batter or even double batter it, season with loads of spices, and fry it up to golden perfection. Recipes to savor include: --Hattie B&rsquos Hot Chicken --Yotam Ottolenghi&rsquos Seeded Chicken Schnitzel with Parsley-Caper Mayonnaise --Marcus Samuelsson&rsquos Coconut Fried Chicken with Collards and Gravy --Jacques-Imo&rsquos Fried Chicken and Smothered Cabbage --The Loveless Café&rsquos Fried Chicken and Hash Brown Casserole --Blackberry Farm&rsquos Sweet Tea&ndashBrined Fried Chicken --Charles Phan&rsquos Hard Water Fried Chicken --Thomas Keller&rsquos Buttermilk Fried Chicken --Wylie Dufresne&rsquos Popeyes-Style Chicken Tenders and Biscuits Sink your teeth into Fried & True, the source of your next great fried chicken masterpiece and a tribute to America&rsquos most beloved culinary treasure.

There are no customer reviews for this item yet.


America's 50 Best Fried Chicken Spots - Recipes

More than 50 Recipes for America's Best Fried Chicken and Sides: A Cookbook

Description

Whether you prefer it cold out of the fridge or hot and crispy on a buttery biscuit, you will find your new favorite fried chicken recipe in Fried & True, serving up more than 50 recipes for America&rsquos most decadently delicious food.

Lee Schrager has left no stone unturned in his quest to find America&rsquos best fried chicken. From four-star restaurants to roadside fry shacks, you&rsquoll learn how to brine your bird, give it a buttermilk bath, batter or even double batter it, season with loads of spices, and fry it up to golden perfection. Recipes to savor include:

-Hattie B&rsquos Hot Chicken
-Yotam Ottolenghi&rsquos Seeded Chicken Schnitzel with Parsley-Caper Mayonnaise
-Marcus Samuelsson&rsquos Coconut Fried Chicken with Collards and Gravy
-Jacques-Imo&rsquos Fried Chicken and Smothered Cabbage
-The Loveless Café&rsquos Fried Chicken and Hash Brown Casserole
-Blackberry Farm&rsquos Sweet Tea&ndashBrined Fried Chicken
-Charles Phan&rsquos Hard Water Fried Chicken
-Thomas Keller&rsquos Buttermilk Fried Chicken
-Wylie Dufresne&rsquos Popeyes-Style Chicken Tenders and Biscuits

Sink your teeth into Fried & True, the source of your next great fried chicken masterpiece and a tribute to America&rsquos most beloved culinary treasure.

Clarkson Potter, 9780770435226, 256pp.

Publication Date: May 20, 2014

About the Author

LEE BRIAN SCHRAGER is the founder and director of the Food Network & Cooking Channel South Beach and New York City Wine & Food Festivals. He is also the vice president of corporate communications and national events at Southern Wine & Spirits of America and the author of Fried and True and The Food Network South Beach Wine & Food Festival Cookbook. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Lee has appeared on Today and Rachael Ray, and serves on the board of directors for the Food Bank of New York City. He lives in Miami and New York City.
 
ADEENA SUSSMAN is a cookbook writer and recipe authority. In addition to this book she also collaborated with Lee Schrager on Fried and True, and is the coauthor of many other cookbooks. Her work has also been published in Food & Wine, The Wall Street Journal, Martha Stewart Living, Every Day with Rachael Ray, and on Epicurious and Food Republic.

EVAN SUNG is a prominent food, lifestyle, and travel photographer based in Brooklyn. His work appears regularly in the New York Times and he has worked on cookbooks with some of the top chefs from around the world.


The Country's Best Fried Chicken

"I'm on the record as a fried-chicken freak," says editor in chief Dana Cowin, who wasn't disappointed by this cult Williamsburg spot known for fried chicken seasoned with paprika, black pepper, and cayenne. "I adored its homey mood and comfort food."

166 S.4th Street 347-529-6090 piesnthighs.com

Two Sisters' Kitchen, in a two-story house, opens only for lunch (every day but Saturday) and serves a buffet of soul food made with recipes culled from all the women in Diann I. Alford's family. "It's like Sunday lunch at your grandmother's," she says. Piled on Sisters' all-you-can-eat buffet: light angel biscuits, grits, and Southern sides that might include turnip greens, as well as corn bread salad (Alford's mother got her to eat vegetables by adding chunks of corn bread). The one constant: "If the front door's open, we have fried chicken," assures Alford.

707 North Congress St. 601-353-1180

Ordering the fried chicken at David Chang's East Village spot requires planning &mdash you'll need a group of four to eight people, and you'll have to reserve the order online. It's worth the hassle. He serves two styles in one sitting: Southern with Old Bay seasoning, and a spicy Korean version. Diners can wrap hot pieces of meat in moo shu pancakes with a variety of sweet and salty sauces.


Watch the video: The Best Pizza In Every State. 50 State Favorites (January 2022).