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Spicy Food Could Make You Live Longer, New Study Says

Spicy Food Could Make You Live Longer, New Study Says


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Go ahead, eat these chile peppers: You might live longer.

People of the world, spice up your life! Do you have a taste for Thai food, or can’t get enough of curry? You may be in luck. A new study published in the British Medical Journal has discovered a strong link between consumption of spicy food and the reduction in mortality risk.The researchers studied the link irrespective of other causes of death. In conclusion: if you have a taste for spicy foods, you may live longer than your blander comrades.

Researchers studied thousands of Chinese men and women over a live period of time, and found that those who consumed spicy foods almost every day were 14 percent more likely to live longer. Researchers have long studied the health benefits of chile peppers; active consumers of spicy peppers may experience decreased appetites.

“The bioactive agents in spices have shown beneficial roles in obesity, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal conditions, various cancers, neurogenic bladder, and dermatological condition,” researchers said. “Spices exhibit antibacterial activity and affect gut microbiota populations, which in humans have been recently related to risks of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver cirrhosis, and cancer… Spices may have a profound influence on morbidities and mortality in humans.”


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Eating This Might Help You Live Longer

Good news for hot sauce lovers: According to new research published in the journal BMJ, eating spicy food might help you live longer. “We know something about the beneficial effect of spicy foods basically from animal studies and very small-sized human studies,” said Lu Qi, study author and associate professor at Harvard's School of Public Health, according to TIME more research was definitely required, though, a void which the current study attempted to fill. Looks like my sriracha habit might actually be paying off!

The researchers examined questionnaire data from approximately 490,000 participants who took part in the China Kadoorie Biobank study during the years 2004 to 2008. The questionnaire included information about each participant's general health, their alcohol consumption, and their food consumption, including how much spicy food they tended to eat and what their main source of chili intake was (fresh, dried, in a sauce, etc.).

Then, seven years later, the researchers checked in with the participants to see where they were at — and here, of course, is where it starts to get interesting: People who ate spicy food at least once or twice a week had reduced their risk of death by 10 percent in comparison with those who ate it only rarely. I say “at least” because there wasn't a notable difference between people who ate spicy food one to two times and week and those who ate it more for those who noshed on something spicy three to seven times a week, the reduced risk of death was 14 percent, which isn't terribly statistically significant, according to Medical Daily.

There was also evidence to support previous findings about the health benefits of chilis: Eating spicy food rich in chilis also correlated with a reduced risk of death from a number of diseases, like cancer, ischemic heart diseases, and respiratory diseases. Fresh chilis were found to have more benefits than dried ones, which makes sense when you think about it that's typically the case for most fruits and veggies, and in the case of chilis in particular, there's more capsaicin and vitamin C in fresh ones than in dried ones.

But as always, let's bear in mind that correlation does not equal causation. As Qi carefully pointed out, we're looking at observational research we don't definitively know whether eating spicy food in general or chili-rich food in particular actually guards against certain health risks. But, said Qi according to TIME, the research is still valuable: “It appears that increasing your intake moderately, just to one to two or three to five times a week, shows very similar protective effect. Just increase moderately. That's maybe enough.”

While we're waiting for more research, here are a few tasty ways you can get some spice into your life — literally:

1. Sriracha

Duh. Rooster sauce is chili-rich, and it makes just about everything taste better. Don't have any on hand? Make your own. Everybody wins!


Watch the video: 6 Βήματα για να γίνεις Αποτυχημένος (July 2022).


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