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Marissa Hermer’s Apple Pie

Marissa Hermer’s Apple Pie


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Beat together 3 tablespoons of the granulated sugar and the butter in a large bowl until it has mixed together. Beat in one egg and then just the yolk of the second. Once this is done slowly add the flour, make sure you don’t just tip it all in, work it in bit by bit.

Once all your ingredients have begun to knot together, use your hands to roll it into a ball that you will then wrap in saran wrap and place in the fridge for about 50 minutes.

Whilst your pastry is chilling start on your filling. Peel the roughly 4 pink lady apples and slice your apples depending on how thick you like them to be, but make sure you have enough to fill the pie dish. At this point it is probably a good idea to switch your oven on at 375° F, so that it’s nice and hot for when your pie is ready to go in.

After 50 minutes, the pastry should be ready to be moulded into a masterpiece. Two-thirds of the pastry will make up the base of the pie, and the remainder will make up the top. Make sure you leave a bit of pastry to mould into decorations for the top of the pie. The bottom of your pie dish should be lined with the pastry and be folded over the edge of the dish.

In a bowl large enough to hold your sliced apples, mix together ½ cup sugar, the cinnamon, nutmeg, and 2 teaspoons of flour. Chuck in your apples and mix together with the sugar and spices so that they are nicely coated. Then evenly stack them into your pie and cover with the pie lid. I like to add some decoration on the top of apple pie, my usual design is just to have 3 or 4 pastry shaped leaves in a circle in the middle, as shown in the picture.

Before you place your pie in the oven make sure you make a few cuts in the lid so as to allow for steam to escape. Leave in the oven for roughly 45 minutes for pie perfection. I like to finish my apple pie with a dollop of crème fraîche with a mint leaf on top however you may prefer ice cream or fresh custard.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Apple Pie Cinnamon Buns

Is it a cinnamon roll with an apple pie twist, or an apple pie in a bun? Either way, these baked gooey rolls smothered in a luscious cream cheese icing merge two of my favorite fall foods together for apple spice bliss that is perfect for your next fall brunch or a lazy rainy day (like today, if you’re in the northeast!)

Although apples feature heavily in American cooking today, apples are actually native to Central Asia and spread to Europe and other parts of Asia before being brought to the Americas by Europeans. And they clearly were well-suited to the climate. Growing up in the northeast, I have so many memories of going apple picking, making caramel apples, bobbing for apples, and of course apple pie. How can you not love fall?

Apple picking at Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard

So why not celebrate the season of apples with a fresh twist on cinnamon buns?

Start by activating your yeast. To do this, yeast needs to sit in liquid that is just the right temperature. Too cold and it won’t activate and the dough won’t rise. Too warm and you kill the yeast. Milk should be warm to the touch, like bath water, but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable to put a finger in it.

Add all other dough ingredients and knead together with your hands. It is generally a wet, sticky dough but if it’s so sticky that after a few minutes of kneading, it’s not forming a dough, you can add more flour. Let the dough sit, covered, in a warm spot for an hour. My favorite proofing spots include on the radiator and on top of a heated oven.

Before (left) and after (right)

While you’re waiting, caramelize the apples. I love to elevate the taste of apples by adding juice from fresh citrus and apple spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom). Cook until apples are soft and most of the liquid has cooked down.

Before cooking (top) and caramelized apples (bottom)

After an hour, your dough should have doubled in size. Flour a large surface – make sure to cover it well lest your dough stick! Turn out the dough and let it sit for 10 minutes.

Roll dough into a 21同” rectangle using a floured rolling pin. To get the dough even, always roll from the middle to the edge, then back to the middle. If it’s misshapen, use your (floured!) hands to stretch it into the shape you want. Now my favorite part: filling! First, brush melted butter across the surface. Then, sprinkle brown sugar, apple spice, and caramelized apples evenly across (make sure to go all the way to the edge). Finally, roll your dough width-wise into a log.

If there’s excess dough at the ends, trim that now. It’s time for your secret weapon: floss! Yes, you heard right. Floss is a fantastic tool for cutting sticky dough. Just gently slide the floss under the log, cross the two ends, and pull apart to cut. Slice the log into 12 sections. I measured in advance to get ones that are even. Place your rolls on a greased baking pan.

Cover the pan and let the rolls sit for 30 minutes. They should grow in size again. This is the time to turn your oven on. Make the cream cheese frosting.

Bake the rolls until lightly browned on top, around 20 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the oven and frosted.


Watch the video: EAT. Eton Mess British Dessert with Marissa Hermer (July 2022).


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